FILM LINC PRESENTS “WHERE I GROW OLD” AND “TERRA EM TRANSE”

“Neighboring Scenes”, Film Linc’s festival devoted to contemporary Latin American cinema,  will present two brazilian films this upcoming Sunday (Jan 29) and Monday (Jan 30): “Where I Grow Old” (A Cidade Onde Envelheço), by Marilia Rocha,  and a special 50th anniversary screening of the classic “Terra em Transe” (Glauber Rocha).

FILM LINC REVIEWS

 “Where I Grow Old” (A Cidade Onde Envelheço) (January 29 @ 8:45 PM)

whereigrowold-1600x900-c-default

Using nonprofessional actors, this fiction film from established documentarian Marilia Rocha explores notions of nationhood and belonging. At the request of her mother, Portuguese expat Francisca welcomes old friend Teresa into her Belo Horizonte apartment. Both are nearly thirty, and find themselves at a crossroads, one created as much by the Portuguese financial crisis as their individual personalities. While Teresa eagerly embraces the rhythms and openness of Brazilian life, Francisca still desires to return to Portugal. Through largely improvised dialogue, Rocha’s beautifully shot film deftly explores their relationships to themselves and their surroundings.

 

“Terra em Transe” (January 29 @ 3:00 PM and January 30 @ 8:00 PM)

CINEMA NACIONAL="TERRA EM TRANSE" Cenas de filmagem 17.10.1966

CINEMA NACIONAL=”TERRA EM TRANSE” Cenas de filmagem 17.10.1966

A pivotal film from one of the key figures of Brazil’s Cinema Novo movement, Terra em Transe is an urgent and poetic account of political corruption, the systems that shape it, and the challenges of active citizenship in times of political upheaval. Made three years after the right-wing coup d’etat in Brazil, the film is set in the fictional country of El Dorado, in which a young intellectual attempts to chart a political path. First joining the extreme right, and then a party of the left, he ultimately finds dispiriting power dynamics in each. Told through a mesmeric style, and mixing surrealist and realist aesthetics, Terra em Transe is a resonant work of political cinema that pushes its audience to examine its own role in civil society.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: